Surgical Site Infection (Ssi) Prevention

Despite considerable research on best practices and strides in refining surgical techniques, technological advances and environmental improvements in the operating room (OR), and the use of prophylactic preoperative antibiotics, infection at the surgical site remains the second most common adverse event occurring to hospitalized patients and a major source of morbidity following surgical procedures.

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Despite considerable research on best practices and strides in refining surgical techniques, technological advances and environmental improvements in the operating room (OR), and the use of prophylactic preoperative antibiotics, infection at the surgical site remains the second most common adverse event occurring to hospitalized patients and a major source of morbidity following surgical procedures. Currently there are more than 40 million inpatient and 31 million outpatient surgeries performed each year in the United States, with at least 2% of these patients, or approximately 1.4 million, developing a surgical site infection (SSI) of varying severity. A comparison study from Duke University conducted in 1999 estimated that a SSI doubled the patient’s risk of death after surgery from 3.5% to 7.8%, increased the likelihood of an ICU stay from 18% to 29%, added 5 days to the hospital stay, doubled the cost of hospitalization from $3,844 to $7,531, and increased the probability of readmission from 7% to 41%. More recent data published in November 2006 by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council (PHC4) revealed the astronomical increases in cost of American healthcare since then. The PHC4 reported that a commercial insurance payment for a patient with a SSI was $27,470, or 70%, greater than a case without an infection; and the actual charge for the care of patients with SSI was much higher still: $132,110 compared to $31,389 for noninfected patients. However high the monetary cost to the healthcare system, the cost to the patient in terms of pain, suffering or loss of life has always been too much.

Through this course, participants shall be able to understand the health care-associated infections – basics of causation, transmission & prevention strategies. The course provides detailed insight into various factors involved the in the development of SSI’s. Trainees shall be able to understand best practices and guidelines to identify and reduce SSI rates. This course will walk through basics of an establishment of infection control program, monitoring, important elements that contribute to SSI development and risk reduction strategies for SSI and improvement of surgical outcomes.
Thus learning objectives of the course include:
• Discuss modes of transmission for important healthcare pathogens.
• Discuss methods for interruption of transmission of pathogens in healthcare settings.
• Discuss how to implement effective methods to prevent transmission.
• Obtain a broad overview of the importance of basic concepts in Infection Prevention including:
o Hand hygiene and asepsis.
o Isolation precautions.
o Disinfection and sterilization.
o Good practices to reduce surgical site infections.

Pursue a Verified Certificate to highlight the knowledge and skills you gain.

The course helps care providers identify opportunities to improve patient safety and improve patient outcomes among surgical patients.

Nursing Staff (NNM, BSc with relevant experience)
OR
Technical / paramedical staff with relevant hospital experience
OR
MBA/Diploma/Certificate course in Healthcare Administration/Management
OR
Doctors (including MBBS, Dentists, and AYUSH etc.)
OR
Diploma in OT Technology

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Other details
   Duration: 4 weeks
   Effort: 3 – 6 Hours per week
   *Stage I Fee: Rs.2000/- (Inclusive of Tax)
   Level: Foundation
   Languages: English
   Interaction Mode: Animation Video , Lectures

* Participation Certificate will Awarded by eQUEST 
* Please read the certification policy for more details 


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